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6th Form Curriculum

Pupils are encouraged to take greater ownership of their learning experiences and are given increasing levels of independence to suit them. A vast array of subject choices is available and pupils are expected to support their A-level choices by taking up the ‘Extended Project Qualification’ or following a series of MOOCs (Massive Open Online Courses). In addition, pupils have the opportunity to attend a number of academic enrichment lectures held throughout the year.

While our 6th Form pupils have the freedom to spread their wings and discover who they are, they also have an extensive pastoral support structure. Our team of tutors and staff is here to guide them through the transition from GCSE to A-level, and ultimately to become a confident and independent learner. There is a strong community ethos within our 6th Form that helps pupils settle in, and staff know the pupils very well, which enables them to deliver individualised academic and pastoral support.

Our 6th Form Centre has dedicated computer and study rooms and communal areas for group work and recreation, and while it enjoys a distinct identity, it remains very much part of the wider school community. This offers pupils a real advantage and presents many avenues to take a leading role in school life and indulge their interests outside the classroom through a wide range of team sports, community initiatives, extra- curricular activities, and enrichment opportunities.

Pupils have access to the considerable experience and academic knowledge offered by the tutor team, coupled with the guidance of the Assistant Deputy Head Academic Leadership, Dr Stuart Miller, myself as Head of 6th Form and Mr Alex Laybourne as my Deputy. This close-knit team ensures that each pupil is supported in their choices and treated as young adults giving them the space and confidence to make their own informed, well thought out decisions.

The following pages introduce you to life in our 6th Form and provides an overview of the courses we offer. I strongly encourage you to visit our 6th Form to meet our pupils and staff, and to experience the wonderful environment that exists here, at first hand.

Kate Taylor, Head of 6th Form

Biology

Biology

Why choose Biology?

Most people can relate to Biology because it is so close to us – literally! Biology is an exciting and dynamic subject to study at A-level.

Topics studied over the course include biological molecules, human and cellular biology, how substances are exchanged, DNA and biodiversity, genetics, photosynthesis and respiration, how organisms respond to changes in their environment, evolution and control of gene expression. Theory lessons are backed up with relevant experimental work. These include physiology investigations, dissections, microscope work and ecological field work.

There is something in the course for everyone and it will stretch all pupils with its diversity and depth of material. Research developments and discoveries quickly find their way into the teaching specification. Recent additions to the curriculum include gene therapy, genetic control, and the commercial application of enzyme technology.

The A-level course builds upon knowledge gained at GCSE and is often combined with Chemistry, Maths, Geography or PE in 6th Form.

What skills will I develop?

Over the course, pupils will improve their practical skills, develop their analytical and mathematical abilities and learn how to interpret data. The course is supported by the Biology Discussion Group which meets weekly to discuss current matters, such as research breakthroughs and ethical issues. The Biology Society also meets weekly to discuss biological topics and raise awareness of important campaigns, such as plastic pollution.

Assessment
The course is assessed via three exams at the end of the Upper 6th Form. Over the two years, students must also pass twelve practical exams in order to be awarded an A-level in Biology.

What do pupils do after studying Biology?
Pupils who study Biology tend to fall into two categories – those who want to study a Biology-based course at university (e.g. Medicine, Veterinary Science, etc) and those seeking to gain a science-based “facilitating” A-level, valued by Russell Group Universities. There is something in the course for everyone and it will stretch all pupils with its diversity and depth of topics. Agriculture, Biochemistry, Conservation, Dentistry, Ecology, Food Science and Genetics through to Zoology are just part of the A-Z of courses that can be accessed after gaining a Biology A-level.

Awarding Body
AQA

Chemistry

Chemistry

Why choose Chemistry?

6th Form pupils choose this subject because they have enjoyed its study and have been successful at GCSE. The continual synthesis of theory and experiment is an attractive combination for many pupils.

Chemistry is a vital component in virtually all science courses and is consequentially often combined with Biology, Maths and Physics. However, many pupils have chosen it alongside other subjects including Art and Geography.

Assessment
The CIE IGCSE course is a great platform and provides a smooth transition to A-level Chemistry. Much of the content explored in the first year builds upon the basic ideas taught at GCSE. The course is divided into three distinct branches – physical, organic and inorganic Chemistry. As the course progresses, pupils are able to link the three facets of the subject and this culminates in a far greater understanding of the subject as a whole.

The course concludes with three exam papers that assess a pupil’s ability to understand and apply all areas of the specification. In addition, a number of practical tasks must be completed within the two years in order to gain a ‘pass’ for this aspect of the course.

What skills will I develop?
Over the two years, many skills are developed and reinforced. In particular, the problem solving and application skills that are sought after both by universities and employers, are at the heart of this subject and prepare individuals for the demands of the more rigorous degrees such as Medicine and Veterinary Science.

Experimental work is carefully used to develop skills and ranges from reinforcing the organic, inorganic and physical theory, to open-ended and discovery practicals.

What do pupils do after studying Chemistry?
Our A-level Chemists go on to a wide variety of degree courses, ranging from Geology to Medicine, and many have commented on the importance of their time at Wisbech Grammar School’s Chemistry Department in preparing them for university study.

Awarding Body
OCR

Physics

Physics

Why choose Physics?

How can things be in two places at once? Is time travel possible? What are the most fundamental building blocks of the Universe? How do everyday machines work? The world is a bewilderingly complex place but, amazingly, it can be understood by using a small number of fundamental principles, to understand particles and the forces that govern their interactions. Physics is the study of these principles. We will study the quark model of matter, follow the most recent findings of the research at The European Organisation for Nuclear Research (CERN) and discover some of the secrets of the formation of the universe.

Assessment
The A-level Physics course begins by covering much of the same subject matter as most GCSE courses, but the treatment is deeper, more rigorous and challenging. We study the equations of motion, properties of materials, electricity and circuits and then move on to study the bizarre nature of the quantum world and the photoelectric effect. In the Upper 6th, the content broadens considerably and we study a number of topics that are at the cutting edge of Physics research.

The course is assessed via three exams at the end of the Upper 6th Form upon which the final grade will be based. In addition, during the 2 years of the course, pupils will be required successfully to complete a number of experimental investigations in order to pass the practical aspect of the course.

What skills will I develop?
Pupils can expect to develop mathematical, practical, social and ethical analytical skills, all of which are increasingly sought after and will make them an attractive candidate to universities and employers. Physics trains the mind to understand and interpret scientific information, to process data and solve problems. It develops practical skills and encourages imagination and also common sense as pupils learn to analyse, build mental pictures, to propose theories and to adopt a critical approach.

What do pupils do after studying Physics?
A-level Physics, in combination with Maths, is required for entry to Higher Education courses in the Physical Sciences and Engineering. Degrees in these subjects can, in turn, lead to a very wide range of careers in areas that include Applied Physics, Astrophysics, Geophysics, Materials Technology, Forensic Science, Engineering, Meteorology and Medical Physics. Physics A-Level is also complementary with intended careers in Medicine, Mathematics and Computing.

Awarding Body
OCR

Psychology

Psychology
Why choose Psychology?

Psychology is the scientific study of thought, emotion and behaviour, posing more questions than it has provided answers for; the perfect course for pupils who want to gain a greater understanding of people and the drivers of human behaviour, while developing their critical thinking. Over the last few years the department has travelled to Berlin, Krakow and Auschwitz to learn about psychological theories that try to explain human behaviour in the Holocaust and the Cold War.

What skills will I develop?
Studying Psychology at A-level is more than just the study of a science; the course allows pupils to engage in debates on contemporary issues with an awareness of a wealth of research. Skills developed are valued by Higher Education providers and employers, such as critical analysis, independent thinking and research.

Improving analytical skills, training the brain to think beyond what is initially presented, challenging established findings that have been posed over the years, testing and questioning different theories, opinions and famous case studies are just a few outcomes to expect from studying Psychology at A-level.

Assessment
There are three papers comprising of multiple choice questions, short answer questions and sixteen marked essays. Within these three papers, 30-33% of the mark will be based on applying knowledge to real life examples.10% of the overall grade will require the use of mathematical skills and 25% will be assessment of the understanding of research methods.

What do pupils do after studying Psychology?
Studying psychology gives pupils a broad range of skills that span both Science and the Arts and can be valuable in a diverse range of environments, opening up opportunities with a variety of employers with the potential to really make a difference to people’s lives.

Awarding Body
AQA

 

 

I enjoyed studying Psychology A-level as it helped me to understand individuals and why they may act the way they do and in ways considered to be outside of social norms. Studying History at UEA, the knowledge gained from Psychology has complemented this by allowing me to recognise how individuals are able to carry out atrocities such as those seen during the Holocaust and the My Lai Massacre. (Former A-level pupil and History scholar)

English Literature

English Literature

Why choose English Literature?

To be an English Literature pupil, or not to be an English Literature pupil? That, as the Bard once said, is the question.

Well, it’s something to do with language…

Without a form of language, we are not human. Without meaning, language becomes random sounds or confusing marks on a page. The pupil studying English Literature looks into the meanings that language conveys.

What skills will I develop?
Through the study of literary texts, pupils explore ideas, emotions and possibilities – and not just those put there by the author; their own thoughts and feelings are important, too. The English Literature pupil develops intellectual curiosity, critical thinking and an ability to render arguments in clear, sustained prose.

Assessment
The OCR specification is followed and this involves three components – two assessed by external, closed book examinations, and one assessed by a folder of coursework.

  • Component 1 is examined and contains two sections. The first is based on a work by Shakespeare while the second calls for comparison of a pre-1900 play with a poetry text from the same broad era.
  • Component 2 is more broad-ranging, organising its material thematically (examples of themes being ‘American Literature’ and ‘Dystopia’); pupils again have to compare and contrast two linked texts, as well as perform a practical criticism exercise on a relevant unseen extract.
  • In Component 3 candidates study three texts, again linked by theme, and produce two pieces of writing; the first is a close reading of a textual extract and the second is a comparative essay.

What do pupils do after studying English Literature?
As a facilitating A-level, English Literature opens many doors to further study and employment. Former English Literature pupils have chosen to pursue a vast array of career paths ranging from Creative Writing at undergraduate level, Law, History of Art, Musical Theatre and Politics. Pupils always comment on the diversity they experience in A-level English Literature, not just in the texts studied, but in the opinions, context, and critical breadth they explore. This knowledge proves invaluable as they venture into the world beyond school – as diversity, and the acceptance and understanding of such, is what unites us.

Awarding Body
OCR

Geography

Geography

Why choose Geography?

Geography is stimulating, inspiring and challenging. It provides pupils with the ability to view social, economic and environmental issues from a wider perspective, as well as understand core physical processes which shape the Earth. Studying A-level Geography at Wisbech Grammar School is more than just the study of a science; it provides an insight into understanding the world around us through the contemporary nature of the issues it tackles.

Enrichment opportunities such as pupil conferences, fieldwork, and the Geography Discussion Group enable pupils to broaden their understanding of the curriculum as well as the wider world.

What skills will I develop?
Geographers are taught a wide-ranging set of skills that are recognised and desired by employers. The breadth of material covered means that Geography is regarded as a facilitator subject by Russell Group universities as it combines well with a wide variety of other subjects, bridging the Sciences and the Arts.

The specification has a strong emphasis on Physical Processes and Landforms, plus a field-based based coursework investigation. There are 4 units of study – Dynamic Landscapes (Tectonics, Glaciated Landscapes), Physical Systems and Sustainability (Water Cycle, Carbon Cycle, Climate Change Futures), Dynamic Places (Globalisation, Regenerating Places) and Human Systems and Geopolitics (Superpowers, Global Development).

In addition, pupils will complete a 3000-4000 word, independent geographical investigation. To support this, fieldwork days will be undertaken, during which pupils will practise the skills required for their investigation.  During a further four days of fieldwork, in the Trinity Term of the Lower 6th, students collect their data under supervision.

Assessment
Assessment will involve three exams and the coursework investigation; papers 1 and 2 test knowledge of core units and geographical skills, whilst paper 3 covers a synoptic investigation of a geographical issue. The coursework investigation will contribute 20% towards the final grade.

What do pupils do after studying Geography?
According to the Royal Geographical Society, Geography graduates have some of the highest rates of graduate employment. Geography is great for any career that involves the environment, planning, or collecting and interpreting data. Popular careers for qualified geographers include town or transport planning, surveying, conservation, sustainability, waste and water management, environmental planning, tourism, and weather forecasting.

Awarding Body
Edexcel

History

History

Why choose History?

History is an important and highly relevant subject. Whether on a personal, local, national or international level, our identity, values and what we hope for in the future are largely defined by what we have been in the past. The course we teach helps pupils to understand Britain’s place in the world and how past events have shaped the present. The first unit examines Britain’s actions as an imperial power and the continuing legacy of our empire. The second unit investigates the events and ideas that shaped the founding of the USA, a nation that continues to have enormous power and influence in the world today. The final part of the course examines German History, considering the key role this nation has played in modern European History.

What skills will I develop?
A-level History develops an informed and enquiring mind. At Wisbech Grammar School we teach the AQA A-level specification. The History course is built around three main units: Breadth Study – 1J The British Empire c.1857-1967; Depth Study – 2G The Birth of the USA 1760-1801; Historical Investigation – Germany 1789-1989.

A-level History requires the study of sources and interpretations as well as traditional essay writing. The course is enriched with opportunities for debate, guest lectures and an annual study day in London.

Assessment
The A-level course is assessed via two final exams (worth 40% each) and a coursework essay (worth 20%).

What do pupils do after studying History?
A-level History is a subject valued by universities and employers alike. Alongside the heritage industry, History can lead to careers in many fields including law, education, economics, politics and the media.

A-level History results and pupil feedback have both been excellent, and many pupils have opted to study the subject at degree level. It is certainly true that studying the past will brighten your future!

Awarding Body
AQA (7042)

Religious Studies

Religious Studies

Why choose Religious Studies?

Religious Studies is a demanding academic discipline in its own right. It engenders critical thinking and rigour in the search for truths in uncertain fields. It encourages philosophical thought, decision-making skills, collaboration and independent working and the search for compromise and conflict resolutions that work.

What skills will I develop?
Religious Studies creates opportunities for young people to develop their skills of dialogue, interpretation and analysis in a coherent context. All these are vital skills in a modern workforce where communication, collaboration and cooperation are core requirements. Religious Studies is multidisciplinary nature, involving textual study, philosophical thinking, ethics, social understanding and the skills of analysis and reasoning.

Assessment
The A-level qualification is assessed via two examinations at the end of two years of study. Each examination is worth 50% of the total mark.

Two components are studied and assessed:

Component 1: is Philosophy of religion and ethics.

Component 2: Study of religion and dialogues.

What do pupils do after studying Religious Studies?
Many pupils will go on to study Humanities or English Literature at a higher level, where they find that the essay writing and evaluative skills fostered by a background in Religious Studies is often of tremendous benefit. The philosophical component of the qualification also means that pupils of Religious Studies are in demand in virtually every type of career where logical reasoning and clear communications skills are essential.

Awarding Body
AQA

 

 

This is an enjoyable, and academically demanding subject, which helps us to develop our skills of logical reasoning, analytical understanding, and clear communication of ideas.  Eleanor Sloan, Lower 6th Form pupil

 

Maths

Maths

Why choose Maths?

Mathematics is ubiquitous, it permeates every aspect of our daily life and transcends language barriers across the world. Its versatility as an A level subject means that it is hugely respected by employers, Higher Education institutions and global organisations.

What skills will I develop?
The A-level requires diligence, accuracy, meticulous attention to detail and a well-organised approach. Pupils become adept at thinking logically and systematically.

Problem-solving is at the heart of the course and pupils will develop resilience, resourcefulness and creative thinking. Through construction of solutions that focus on modelling and proof, pupils learn how to formulate reasoned arguments and develop the ability to analyse and interpret data. The skills learnt in A-level Maths complement many other A-level subjects including Physics, Chemistry, Biology, and Geography. Studying Further Mathematics gives pupils the opportunity to explore Pure Mathematics and Applied Mathematics at a deeper level.

Assessment
The Edexcel syllabus guides pupils to develop mathematical thinking, relating ideas to everyday life. This is a new linear course of 2 years’ duration with no modular components – instead examination is by three papers: Pure 1 Mathematics, Pure 2 Mathematics and Applied Mathematics, the latter comprising Mechanics and Statistics.

What do pupils do after studying Maths?
For most STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics) Degree courses A-level maths is essential. It is also highly regarded in subjects allied to Medicine, Economics/Accountancy and Geography. Pupils comment that although the course is challenging it is also immensely rewarding.

Awarding Body
Pearson Edexcel

Business

Business

Why choose Business?

Business is a popular subject which is both theoretical and practical. It opens the doors to many careers. It is fast-paced, interactive and comprises an excellent variety of topics from Marketing to Corporate Ethics. It also covers a number of useful fundaments, such as Accounting basics.

What skills will I develop?
With a focus on helping you to become a good decision maker, in Business, you will learn essential managerial skills, alongside techniques to help you become an analytical problem solver. These skills are all highly sought after and valued in a wide range of careers.

To study Business at Wisbech Grammar School is to focus on the dynamic nature of the contemporary business world. You’ll explore a wide variety of different areas of business, from key internal functions, such as Finance and Marketing to Strategy and Globalisation.

The course is designed to give you the chance to develop and apply the full range of academic skills while allowing the practical elements of business to be enjoyed. In Lower 6th, the focus is on decision-making and in Upper 6th, strategic decision-making. You’ll need to be willing to keep up-to-date with business news and be prepared to discuss and consider the very real challenges 21st-Century businesses encounter.

Assessment
A-level assessment consists of three exams at the end of the two-year course. Each exam will be worth a third of the A-level. All three papers will draw on material from the whole course and will feature a range of question styles including multiple choice, short answer questions, essay questions, data response questions and case studies.

What do pupils do after studying Business?
Business provides an excellent foundation for many degree courses and apprenticeships. Whatever you decide to do in the future, you will almost certainly have a career which requires you to work with people and work towards the goals of the organisation. Much of the theory we study can be useful in many jobs, for example, an understanding of motivational theory helps develop people management skills.

Many pupils go on to study Business-related degrees, including Business Management, International Business and Accountancy; however apprenticeships are becoming very popular, and you may ultimately want to start your own business. If this is the case, Marketing and Finance, which we also study, will be similarly useful.

Awarding Body
AQA

Economics

Economics

Why choose Economics?

Economics enlightens you about how and why resources are distributed, how money works across the world and why things cost what they do. There are overlaps with Finance, Business, Politics and Geography – therefore it ‘sits’ well as a companion subject to your other A-levels.

Economics relates to every aspect of our lives, from the decisions we make as individuals or families to the structures created by government and firms. The economic way of thinking can help us make better choices.

Studying an Economics A-level at Wisbech Grammar School will equip you with the skills to explain who will get what, how they will get it and why. It is an engaging subject that can take you beyond the confines of school and out into the wider world.

What skills will I develop?
You will learn to think in different ways as you study a subject which is always current. You will develop data handling and writing skills which are transferable to both university and employment, and you will learn how to think critically about a range of issues.

It is a subject which will develop skills which you can then pursue further by studying Economics at university or transfer those skills to other pathways.

The course investigates the micro and macro environment of economic theory. We study the functions of markets and the behaviour of firms that operate within them and we focus on the wider global trade patterns and drivers of growth in world economies. Lessons explore the core concepts as well as using current economic issues to add context to your learning.

There are four themes:

Introduction to markets and market failure

The UK economy – performance and policies

Business behaviour and the labour market

A global perspective

Assessment
You will be assessed through three examinations, using a range of different question styles.

What do pupils do after studying Economics?
You might want to study a degree in Economics, Business Economics, Econometrics or a Business and Management Degree and subsequently progress to a career in industry, commerce, finance or the civil service.

Awarding Body
Edexcel

Politics

Politics

Why choose Politics?

Lively, relevant, controversial… there are many ways to describe A-level Politics. There’s no denying that it’s one of the most interesting and engaging qualifications you can choose. Deciding who has power and how they can use it affects us all; this is what Politics means. Pupils studying it learn how laws are made, what MPs do and how pressure groups work behind the scenes.

Covering news and current affairs from the UK and US, it helps you understand how the UK is run and develops research, written communication and debateing skills.

The course is extremely topical: what is read in the press or seen on the news channels during the 6th Form will be relevant to the final exam. No previous knowledge of Politics is needed – but most pupils find that the more they know, the more they enjoy it; this is why so many have gone on to study Politics at university. The annual trip to Parliament also shows pupils how power can be quite intoxicating.

What skills will I develop?
There are three areas to study: the UK, the USA and the development of key ideas such as feminism and liberalism. The breadth of the course extends to the EU and ‘Brexit,’ Obama and Trump, devolution and dirty (political) tricks! Pupils will learn to analyse speeches and key texts, how to write analytically and become adept at making comparisons across political systems and centuries of political thought.

Assessment
There are three exam papers and no coursework. Each exam consists of a variety of question types, including explanations of extracts and essays. The lessons will provide plenty of practice at the exam-style questions.

What do pupils do after studying Politics?
Many pupils go on to study Politics at university – or an allied subject such as International Relations. Politics can also be studied in conjunction with a foreign language, and so there are opportunities to travel to mainland Europe.

Awarding Body
AQA

German

German

Why choose German?

German is spoken by around 100 million people worldwide and is, as such, the most widely used language in the European Union. It is spoken natively by people in Germany, Austria, Switzerland,  as well as in some large German-speaking communities in parts of the USA and Australia. Given the amount of trade that British companies do with their German-speaking counterparts, employees who have a good knowledge of German are highly sought after.

The cultural topics have proven to be of particular interest to pupils, offering a real insight into German life, customs and traditions, often based on historical events.

What skills will I develop?
Studying German at A-level offers the chance to develop a wide range of transferable skills. By the end of the course, pupils will be able to communicate confidently in spoken German, as well as having gained a deeper understanding of cultural topics. The topics studied include the environment, education, work, music, media and festivals, as well as the in-depth study of a film and play. All aspects of grammar will be taught through authentic, topic-based materials, enabling pupils to produce accurate and complex pieces of writing.

Assessment

Paper 1: Listening, reading and translation (40%)
Paper 2: Written response to works and translation (30%) Paper 3: Speaking (30%)

What do pupils do after studying German?

As an A-level, it is extremely well regarded by Higher Education institutions and employers. In recent years some pupils have continued to study German at university.

Awarding Body
Edexcel

French

French

Why choose French?

Pupils choosing French A-level can expect to improve their language skills to near-fluency level, achieving confidence in speaking in public. In today’s world, the need for language speakers remains as strong as ever. Recently, Russell Group Universities have indicated a strong interest in pupils with a language at A-level for their Medicine course. Law and Journalism also remain popular combinations with an A-level in French.

What skills will I develop?
Listening, reading and writing skills will be developed by reading articles and online magazines and accessing videos on the topics of current trends of French-speaking society (family, education and work) and artistic culture (music, media and festivals). Pupils will also study in depth one novel, No et Moi (2007) and one film, Au Revoir les Enfants (1987). Speaking skills will be developed to near-fluency level by group discussions, debates, as well as one-to-one weekly conversations with native speakers in the department.

Assessment

  • Paper 1: Listening, reading and translation (40%)
  • Paper 2: Written response to works and translation (30%)
  • Paper 3: Speaking (30%)

What do pupils do after studying French?
In recent years pupils have gone on to do a variety of courses at university such as Applied Languages at the University of Portsmouth, French and Spanish at Aston University, French at Leeds University and International Management and Modern Languages at Bath.

Awarding Body
Edexcel

Spanish

Spanish

Why choose Spanish?

Spanish is a wonderful language with a rich cultural heritage. It has roughly the same number of first language speakers as English and is continually growing. It is estimated that by 2050 there will be 530 million Spanish speakers in the world, 38 million of whom will be living in the USA. Speaking Spanish will help open doors not only for jobs in Spain or Latin America but also in the UK and the USA as the number of Spanish speakers and businesses keeps growing worldwide.

What skills will I develop?
The course aims to develop in greater depth the four communication developed studied at GCSE (listening, speaking, reading and writing) by studying topical issues through the medium of Spanish. Areas studied are family, work, tourism, music, festivals and media, as well as the film El Laberinto del Fauno (2006). All pupils are encouraged to participate in the week-long language and culture course in Salamanca during the Easter holiday.

Assessment

  • Paper 1: Listening, reading and translation (40%)
  • Paper 2: Written response to works and translation (30%)
  • Paper 3: Speaking (30%)

What do pupils do after studying Spanish?
In addition to the language-based professions such as teaching, interpreting and translating, there are many other careers which you can pursue with a Spanish A-level, such as Journalism, Medicine or Law.

Recent pupils completing A-level Spanish have achieved outstanding results and are thoroughly enjoying language courses at university.

Awarding Body
Edexcel

Art and Design

Art and Design

Why choose Art and Design?

Art and Design A-level is suited to those who have a genuine interest in the subject and want to develop their creativity in either Fine Art or Textiles. The course aims to discover and develop personal creative directions. To do this, pupils will be stretched to improve their practical skills in the use of a range of media and an interesting course structure helps to stretch creative minds for fresh ideas. As the creative industries move into first place to be the fastest growing economic sector in the UK, responsible for 5.6% of jobs, and worth £76.9bn to the UK economy, there has never been a better time to exploit your creativity!

What skills will I develop?
Alongside practical Art and Design skills, pupils will explore their own creativity allowing thinking “outside of the box” and encouraging original methods of problem- solving. They will also be asked to think critically about their own work and the work of professional artists and be encouraged to visit exhibitions, galleries and, where possible, artists’ studios. Local, national and international trips and visits are arranged periodically.

Assessment
60% practical portfolio project, 40% exam, particularly suiting pupils who prefer a more coursework based course

What do pupils do after studying Art and Design?
As well as having an excellent record of exam results at A-level, the Art and Design Department gives pupils support with the preparation of a portfolio for interviews.

Our past pupils have progressed to take up positions as Architects, Fashion Designers, Advertising Creatives, Graphic Designers, Product Designers and Illustrators, Professional Artists, Teachers, Surface Pattern Designers, and Fashion Promoters.

A-level Art and Design is a respected subject and can complement other subjects well when applying to university for a wide variety of courses. Other pupils have chosen a diverse career path ranging from Primary Teaching, Medicine, English, Events Management, Economics and Business Studies.

Awarding Body
OCR Art and Design: Fine Art
Or
OCR Art and Design: Textiles

Design and Technology

Design and Technology

Why choose Design and Technology?

The Design and Technology Product Design A-level course has been devised after consultation between the exam boards, James Dyson, the Design & Technology Teachers’ Association and the Engineering Council to equip young designers and engineers of the future with the skills they will need for an ever-increasing technical workplace. The Product Design course achieves these aims through a two-year linear course that develops an individual’s core technological knowledge and their practical creativity, innovative flair, and capability.

What skills will I develop?
Pupils will study core technological principles including Science and Maths appropriate to originating sustainable and responsible design concepts. During their first year of the course, pupils work on two mini-projects which provides experience of using 3D modelling software and the skill to turn a photo-realistic scale computer model of a product into a manufactured working prototype.

During the Lent Term, the Lower 6th Form pupils start to apply their newly acquired graphic and practical skills to a major project culminating at the end of the Lent Term in the Upper 6th and displayed at the coursework presentation evening.

Assessment
Pupils are assessed based on their practical coursework and via an exam at the end of the two-year course, each of the two elements counting 50% towards the final A-level grade.

What do pupils do after studying Design and Technology?
As a department, we track closely the final destinations of our former pupils and are proud that 100% have found a job in their studied profession very quickly, having clearly benefitted through studying D&T at Wisbech Grammar School. Career progressions include Civil, Electrical, General, Mechanical, Automotive and Aeronautical Engineering with Commercial Pilot’s Licence, Architecture, Town Planning and careers in the Armed Forces. Currently, we have past pupils who are working on new nuclear power plant project management as part of their Civil Engineering degree and Project Management for the new HS2 rail link.

Awarding Body
Edexcel.

 

 

I find the course really interesting and enjoy the many opportunities to realise my creative ideas. It’s unlike any other lesson I go to because we learn so many things about life after school and talk a great deal about the world of work and what opportunities we will have in the future.  Amy Everall, Upper 6th Form pupil

 

Drama and Theatre

Drama and Theatre

Why choose  Drama  and Theatre?

Drama and Theatre provides a fantastic curriculum to ignite and engage pupils’ creativity, passion, and interests. It will provide pupils opportunities to interrogate drama and the work of others, to explore a range of drama as a practical art form, and to work independently to create their own drama performances making informed artistic choices.

What skills will I develop?
The course will help create independent learners, critical thinkers and effective decision makers – all personal attributes that can make pupils stand out as they progress through their education and into employment. Having separate performance and design components for the non-exam assessment allows pupils to follow their own interests and study either performance or design skills in depth.

Pupils will develop and apply an informed, analytical framework for making, performing, interpreting and understanding drama and theatre. They will understand the importance of research when creating practical work and develop an understanding and appreciation of how the social, cultural and historical contexts of performance texts have influenced the development of drama and theatre.

Assessment
This course consists of three components that are externally assessed and one component that is assessed by the centre and externally moderated by OCR.

  • ‘Practitioners in practice’ (Devised Performance exam) is internally assessed. This component consists of a research report, a portfolio and a performance. 40% of the qualification.
  • ‘Exploring and performing texts’ (Scripted Performance exam) is externally assessed. This component is non-exam assessment and consists of a pro forma completed by learners before a performance for a visiting examiner. 20% of the qualification.
  • ‘Analysing performance’ is an examined component consisting of extended response essay questions. 20% of the qualification.
  • ‘Deconstructing texts for performance’ is an examined component, consisting of an annotation of an extract from the text and an extended response question. 20% of the qualification.

What do pupils do after studying Drama and Theatre?
In the past pupils who have studied Drama have gone on to university to read Medicine, Archaeology, Law, Music and Creative Writing. Some pupils train as teachers, actors, stage managers or become facilitators in museums and at tourist destinations. Many have gained places at vocational colleges such as the London Academy of Music & Dramatic Art, Mountview and The Liverpool Institute of Performing Arts.

Awarding Body
OCR.

Music

Music

Why choose Music?

In the words of Albert Einstein: “The greatest scientists are artists as well.” Music is an integral part of everyday life and is constantly evolving, inspiring creativity and expression in a way that no other subject can. AQA A-level Music offers the chance to study a wide range of musical genres, through listening, performance, and composition, building on the skills developed through GCSE.

What skills will I develop?
The course has a degree of built-in flexibility that enables pupils to focus on areas of personal interest. Alongside the study of western art music, there are opportunities to explore pop and jazz, as well as how music is used in media and theatre. The compositional component encourages pupils to develop their own style, in addition to learning about the way music has been crafted by other composers. Performing is the way in which we engage with music on a very personal level and is an essential aspect of the way in which musicians learn about music. Studying Music at A-level will help build problem-solving, research, planning, analytical and critical thinking skills, as well as developing creativity.

Assessment
There are three components within the A-level course which are: Composition, Performance and Listening and Appraising.

What do pupils do after studying Music?
Music A-level supports progression into Higher Education in Music and related subjects, as well as providing all pupils with a platform to inspire a lifelong interest and enjoyment of music. Most of our A-level candidates move on to study Music at university. Beyond that, careers in music include performing, composing and arranging, education and music therapy, music administration and management, music production and the wider creative industries.

Awarding Body
AQA.

 

 

Studying Music at A-level  gives you the choice to learn about styles of music that you are particularly interested in – like pop and musical theatre. (6th  Form pupil)

BTEC Sport

BTEC Sport

Why choose BTEC Sport Level 3?

BTEC Level 3 Nationals are vocational qualifications designed to help pupils succeed within the sports industry. They have been developed in collaboration with over 5,000 universities, employers and professional bodies with employability at their heart, so our pupils can develop the skills and confidence they will need to step into their future. This qualification is recognised by universities and will enable pupils to study PE & Sport to degree-level and beyond. This may be taken alongside one or two A-levels or another BTEC, leading to a Certificate or Diploma respectively.

What skills will I develop?
Studying BTEC Sport will give pupils a diverse look at sport through developing their understanding of Anatomy and Physiology and Fitness training. They will also examine professional development within the sports industry and the application of fitness testing. Pupils will be introduced to areas such as Sports Psychology, Coaching, Performance, organising sporting events as well as Sports Leadership.

Assessment
This BTEC has been designed as part of a two-year programme, and is normally taken in conjunction with one or more A-levels depending on the course selected. The Extended Certificate is equivalent in study time to one A-level and consists of four teaching units (three mandatory and one optional) while the Diploma equates to two A-levels consisting of nine units (six mandatory plus three optional).

Pupils will be assessed through internal assignments that may be both written and practically based, externally assessed units that are set and marked by Pearson and written examinations.

What do pupils do after studying BTEC Sport Level 3?
Pupils studying this course have progressed to employment or further study in Sports Science, Sports Coaching, Sports Therapy, Physiotherapy, PE Teaching, Sports Psychology, Sports Management, and Sports Development.

Awarding Body
Pearson

Hospitality

Hospitality

Why choose Hospitality?

Over the past few years, employment in the hospitality industry has increased faster than for the economy overall. It contributes to more than 2.5 million jobs in the UK across sectors such as hotels, restaurants, pubs, tourism, sports clubs and stadia, in-house catering, exhibitions, cinemas and events to name but a few; this is forecast to continue to grow by 3.8% per annum until at least 2025.

Hospitality is a lively, vibrant industry, with a vast number of choices and areas in which to forge a career. Whether you want to be managing a top flight hotel, organising the finances, directing a high profile event or developing dishes for international restaurant menus, hospitality will always be challenging and exciting. It can take you around the world if you so wish.

What skills will I develop?
This course allows pupils to study modules including Event Management, Food and Drinks Service, The Hospitality Industry, Food Safety, Customer Service, Marketing, Asian Food, Contemporary World Food.

Skills developed include decision making, leadership, budgeting, strategic thinking, communication skills, creative thinking, and customer care. The course contains theory lessons but also includes practical lessons each week. It will be important to visit a variety of different venues and outlets. Therefore, pupils will visit a variety of establishments and make links with industry ambassadors.

Assessment
Assessment of this qualification is through evidence of the application of knowledge via research portfolios, practical tasks, written reports, and presentations.

What do pupils do after studying Hospitality?
Pupils can go on and study at university, go abroad to a Hotel Management College or take on an apprenticeship within the industry. University courses could include Business, Marketing, Food Management, Event Management, International Hospitality, Tourism and Hospitality Management, Culinary Arts Management, Food Science and Nutrition.

This BTEC Subsidiary Diploma is the equivalent of one A-level and earns UCAS points.

Awarding Body
Pearson.

Wisbech Grammar School
Whole School Open Morning, Saturday September 28, 1000 – 1230

From Kindergarten to 6th Form, contact our Admissions Team for more information on 01945 586 750 or email, admissions@wisbechgrammar.com- book here